Knowing Convergence

mercoledì, marzo 16, 2005


Simulations and the Future of Learning
by Clark Aldrich, Accelerating Change 2004
Six criteria are emerging as critical not just to simulations but to all successful educational experiences. Three are focused on content, and three on delivery elements. The key criteria for content are: 1. Linear content. 2. Systems of content. 3. Cyclical content. Additional criteria for delivery elements are: 4. Simulation elements that model reality. 5. Game elements that provide familiar and entertaining interactions. 6. Pedagogical (didactic) elements that ensure the students’ time is spent productively.
Clark Aldrich is the co-founder of SimuLearn and the author of, Simulations and the Future of Learning. He recently lead the international team that created SimuLearn's Virtual Leader, the first ever learning experience to follow the development cycle of a modern computer game.
The simulation is currently being translated into other languages. SimuLearn became an Eduventures 100 company in 2003.
In February 2002, Aldrich was listed as one of the 20 people to watch in the Lifelong Learning Market Report. In 2001, the American Society of Training and Development identified him as one of nine members of Training’s New Guard. In 2000, he was chosen as one of three e-learning "gurus" by Fortune magazine and was named one of Training magazine's 16 visionaries of the industry.


Video games can improve performance in vision tasks
I played 24 hours of video games with my son. It turns out, even aside from perfecting my guacamole recipe, the experience may have done me some good.
C. Shawn Green and Daphne Bavelier of the University of Rochester conducted a study in which they found that avid video game players were better at several different visual tasks compared to non-gamers (”Action Video Game Modifies Visual Attention,” Nature, 2003). Just how much gaming do you need to do in order to improve your vision? In the initial experiment, Green and Bavelier compared gamers who played an hour or more most days for the previous six months to people with little or no game-playing during the same period. They reasoned that avid gamers might not have learned the visual tasks by playing games; they might naturally have been better at them, or their motor-control skills might be better.
(...)
After only a short training period, video games can improve performance in related, but different tasks. What remains unclear, and what I do hope Green and Bavelier will study in the future, is why, after 24 hours, I still can’t beat my son in Super Smash Bros.


Knowledge representation
Representation is fundamental to working with knowledge in my view. I'm collecting my thoughts here.
Ad hoc sketches, informal qualitative models, scenario construction, concept maps, rule sets, structured text all serve as representation, reflecting the expectations and experience of their creators, they connect collaboration to future use. They serve a dual role: (a) to facilitate design and critique and (b) to serve as the holder for the product to be, they are affordances in design, which they can enhance or inhibit.
Mediating in collaboration
Representation as container
Representation as mapping
Rule repository


martedì, novembre 02, 2004


How To Quantify The User Experience [Usability and Information Architecture]: "How To Quantify The User Experience By Robert Rubinoff
Many look to the user experience as an overall indicator of Website success. Analyzing how effectively a Website provides for a net positive user experience can often turn into a subjective affair, rife with opinion and short on objectivity.
This article outlines a quick-and-dirty methodology for quantifying the user experience, which I've found to be very useful in providing clients with a quick, objective, visual representation of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition or past development efforts. "
(...)
"The user experience is primarily made up of a four factors:


  • branding

  • usability

  • functionality

  • content
"


"Practical Uses
I've incorporated this analysis into a number of different projects on which I've worked. Often, I include a 'quick and dirty' analysis as an appendix to a new client proposal, to provide the prospective clients a snapshot view of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition.
Providing this kind of review also gives you an excellent chance to display your professionalism. Chances are that other firms bidding on the RFP in question will not include such 'free' consulting services -- and your inclusion of this report in your proposal may be a decisive factor in your favor.
In other instances, I've had clients pay for an in-depth analysis of their site complete with recommendations. This type of report includes, for each of the statements or parameters, several descriptive paragraphs complete with examples or screen shots. If I'm ultimately hired to follow through on my recommendations, I often schedule another evaluation six months after the launch of the site as a means of showing improvement, while at the same time reinforcing the value of my services.
This type of analysis can also serve as a gateway project that leads to further business. If you price the analysis well, it can be a great tool for getting your foot in the door and showing the new client the benefits of your services."


How To Quantify The User Experience [Usability and Information Architecture]: "How To Quantify The User Experience By Robert Rubinoff
Many look to the user experience as an overall indicator of Website success. Analyzing how effectively a Website provides for a net positive user experience can often turn into a subjective affair, rife with opinion and short on objectivity.
This article outlines a quick-and-dirty methodology for quantifying the user experience, which I've found to be very useful in providing clients with a quick, objective, visual representation of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition or past development efforts. "
(...)
"The user experience is primarily made up of a four factors:


  • branding

  • usability

  • functionality

  • content
"


"Practical Uses
I've incorporated this analysis into a number of different projects on which I've worked. Often, I include a 'quick and dirty' analysis as an appendix to a new client proposal, to provide the prospective clients a snapshot view of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition.
Providing this kind of review also gives you an excellent chance to display your professionalism. Chances are that other firms bidding on the RFP in question will not include such 'free' consulting services -- and your inclusion of this report in your proposal may be a decisive factor in your favor.
In other instances, I've had clients pay for an in-depth analysis of their site complete with recommendations. This type of report includes, for each of the statements or parameters, several descriptive paragraphs complete with examples or screen shots. If I'm ultimately hired to follow through on my recommendations, I often schedule another evaluation six months after the launch of the site as a means of showing improvement, while at the same time reinforcing the value of my services.
This type of analysis can also serve as a gateway project that leads to further business. If you price the analysis well, it can be a great tool for getting your foot in the door and showing the new client the benefits of your services."


How To Quantify The User Experience [Usability and Information Architecture]: "How To Quantify The User Experience By Robert Rubinoff
Many look to the user experience as an overall indicator of Website success. Analyzing how effectively a Website provides for a net positive user experience can often turn into a subjective affair, rife with opinion and short on objectivity.
This article outlines a quick-and-dirty methodology for quantifying the user experience, which I've found to be very useful in providing clients with a quick, objective, visual representation of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition or past development efforts. "
(...)
"The user experience is primarily made up of a four factors:


  • branding

  • usability

  • functionality

  • content
"


"Practical Uses
I've incorporated this analysis into a number of different projects on which I've worked. Often, I include a 'quick and dirty' analysis as an appendix to a new client proposal, to provide the prospective clients a snapshot view of where their site stands vis-à-vis the competition.
Providing this kind of review also gives you an excellent chance to display your professionalism. Chances are that other firms bidding on the RFP in question will not include such 'free' consulting services -- and your inclusion of this report in your proposal may be a decisive factor in your favor.
In other instances, I've had clients pay for an in-depth analysis of their site complete with recommendations. This type of report includes, for each of the statements or parameters, several descriptive paragraphs complete with examples or screen shots. If I'm ultimately hired to follow through on my recommendations, I often schedule another evaluation six months after the launch of the site as a means of showing improvement, while at the same time reinforcing the value of my services.
This type of analysis can also serve as a gateway project that leads to further business. If you price the analysis well, it can be a great tool for getting your foot in the door and showing the new client the benefits of your services."


mercoledì, ottobre 27, 2004


"Le trasmissioni saranno riprese al più presto possibile"

...ricordate questa frase? Compariva quando c'erano problemi tecnici della televisione, ai tempi in cui c'era solo la RAI. Non era una cosa rara e la gente non si stizziva neppure troppo, mentre oggi griderebbe allo scandalo.
Oggi l'interruzione è inaudita e in genere suscita commenti del tipo "Una volta queste cose non sarebbero successe", mentre è vero proprio il contrario.
Quelli che non si sono stufati di attendere si sono facilmente accorti che l'interruzione di Knowledge Convergence è stata particolarmente lunga (l'ultimo blog è di febbraio e ora siamo in ottobre, ma la vera sospensione si può far risalire addirittura all'estate del 2003).
Quali sono le ragioni? Tante, riassumibili comunque con il fatto che si tratta di one-man-URL e quindi quando per una somma di concomitanze quell'oneman non può darsi da fare non c'è nessuno che lo sostituisca.
Nel frattempo nel campo dell'e-learning sono cambiate molte cose e tutte nel senso che è stato preconizzato in questo sito, negli articoli e nei libri da molto tempo, ormai.
Ovvero che l'e-learning come macchina da insegnamento è fallita e con essa i meccanicisti del settore che inneggiavano alla fine della formazione vecchia maniera. Le piattaforme, ma anche le metodologie tendono sempre più alla convergenza cui si richiama il nostro sito (prova ne sia l'epitaffio cui ci siamo sempre richiamati "Inquietudini e tendenze nel convergere e separarsi dei sentieri degli apprendimenti e delle conoscenze condivise"). Dalle ceneri del meccanicistico e-learning sta risorgendo la formazione eteroclita non tanto sotto la forma abortiva delle blended solutions, quanto come comunità di pratiche (o, se proprio ci tenete, communities of practice o business community management).
Insomma, non siamo spariti perché pentiti (mai stati più soddisfatti della nostra coerenza - pluralia majestatis), né perché il settore non tira più (essendo sempre stati schierati contro il facile business, forse ci sono più opportunità oggi che ieri).
Non voglio neppure lasciare facili promesse: da qualche tempo ci tenevo a riprendere questo discorso e solo oggi provo a ripartire con l'intenzione non troppo velleiataria di proseguire.
Conto però sempre sul vostro supporto - questo è il fatto che fa la differenza - e, visto che il forum, la chat e pure il guestbook non sono stati usati, provo ad abilitare i commenti: non si sa mai!!!
La pigrizia non è soltanto mia, anzi!
So che, nonostante questo stacco, il sito è abbastanza consultato e, nonostante l'argomento specialistico e la distanza dai centri di dibattito, vanta un discreto page ranking.
Allora forse vale la pena di proseguire.
Un'ultimo avviso: a causa di un disastro nell'archivio della posta le richieste di iscrizione alla newsletter dell'ultimo anno sono andate perse senza essere state aggiornate. Semplicemente rimandatemele. Sapete come.
Ben ritrovati e a presto
Ennio Martignago


"Le trasmissioni saranno riprese al più presto possibile"
...ricordate questa frase? Compariva quando c'erano problemi tecnici della televisione, ai tempi in cui c'era solo la RAI. Non era una cosa rara e la gente non si stizziva neppure troppo, mentre oggi griderebbe allo scandalo.
Oggi l'interruzione è inaudita e in genere suscita commenti del tipo "Una volta queste cose non sarebbero successe", mentre è vero proprio il contrario.
Quelli che non si sono stufati di attendere si sono facilmente accorti che l'interruzione di Knowledge Convergence è stata particolarmente lunga (l'ultimo blog è di febbraio e ora siamo in ottobre, ma la vera sospensione si può far risalire addirittura all'estate del 2003).
Quali sono le ragioni? Tante, riassumibili comunque con il fatto che si tratta di one-man-URL e quindi quando per una somma di concomitanze quell'oneman non può darsi da fare non c'è nessuno che lo sostituisca.
Nel frattempo nel campo dell'e-learning sono cambiate molte cose e tutte nel senso che è stato preconizzato in questo sito, negli articoli e nei libri da molto tempo, ormai.
Ovvero che l'e-learning come macchina da insegnamento è fallita e con essa i meccanicisti del settore che inneggiavano alla fine della formazione vecchia maniera. Le piattaforme, ma anche le metodologie tendono sempre più alla convergenza cui si richiama il nostro sito (prova ne sia l'epitaffio cui ci siamo sempre richiamati "Inquietudini e tendenze nel convergere e separarsi dei sentieri degli apprendimenti e delle conoscenze condivise"). Dalle ceneri del meccanicistico e-learning sta risorgendo la formazione eteroclita non tanto sotto la forma abortiva delle blended solutions, quanto come comunità di pratiche (o, se proprio ci tenete, communities of practice o business community management).
Insomma, non siamo spariti perché pentiti (mai stati più soddisfatti della nostra coerenza - pluralia majestatis), né perché il settore non tira più (essendo sempre stati schierati contro il facile business, forse ci sono più opportunità oggi che ieri).
Non voglio neppure lasciare facili promesse: da qualche tempo ci tenevo a riprendere questo discorso e solo oggi provo a ripartire con l'intenzione non troppo velleiataria di proseguire.
Conto però sempre sul vostro supporto - questo è il fatto che fa la differenza - e, visto che il forum, la chat e pure il guestbook non sono stati usati, provo ad abilitare i commenti: non si sa mai!!!
La pigrizia non è soltanto mia, anzi!
So che, nonostante questo stacco, il sito è abbastanza consultato e, nonostante l'argomento specialistico e la distanza dai centri di dibattito, vanta un discreto page ranking.
Allora forse vale la pena di proseguire.
Un'ultimo avviso: a causa di un disastro nell'archivio della posta le richieste di iscrizione alla newsletter dell'ultimo anno sono andate perse senza essere state aggiornate. Semplicemente rimandatemele. Sapete come.
Ben ritrovati e a presto
Ennio Martignago


"How can I evaluate the writing in an online procedure manual?:
ANSWERS

Yakimovicz
Writing for online documentation is slightly different than writing for either e-learning or general Web site content. Someone who can create or revise help files or other procedures records that are immediately sensible and usable is an exemplary communicator, in my experience. Kirkpatrick's Level 1 and Level 3 evaluations could be useful here. Ask front line staff whether they actually use the documentation; if so, how they use it--if not, why they don't use it. Implement a survey system that allows you to collect user input on a regular basis, such as twice a year, and use that input to improve the writing.
Great references I use over and over again:
? Standards for Online Communication, by JoAnn Hackos and Dawn Stevens
? Designing and Writing Online Documentation: Hypermedia for Self-Supporting
Products, by William Horton
? Documentation Standards and Procedures for Online Systems (unfortunately
out of print but superb!), by Martin Rubin

Kaplan-Leiserson
Several past Learning Circuits columns discussed writing online. In this Answer Geek, Beth Tang and Aina Irbe talk about the importance of online readability. Points to remember include putting the most important information first in case your readers don?t scroll down the page and using short paragraphs, bullets, and bold-face text to break up long blocks of text.
Tang and Irbe offer a list of online resources with more information, including the Learning Circuits E-Learning 1.0 article 'Write Right: Polishing Your E-Learning Prose,' which provides reminders about crucial points for online writing such as remembering your audience, watching your tone, a"


Customer Training Is Outsourcing’s Hottest Trend
By Paul Harris
Corporate training isn’t just for the workforce any more. E-learning’s advantages and other incentives are spurring organizations throughout the world to outsource the training of their business and consumer customers. Driving the bandwagon is a fraternity of outsourcing suppliers eager to build a new revenue stream.


lunedì, febbraio 09, 2004


Ten Ways to Avoid Death by PowerPoint
by Clive Shepherd and David Kori
A matter of life and death
Thirty million PowerPoint presentations are delivered each day. The majority are dull, repetitive and over-laden with text. They may be quick and easy to produce, but they just don’t work.
Help is at hand. Excuse yourself from the next management meeting and, while your colleagues are subjected to more mind-numbing recitations of endless bullet points, spend a few hours instead discovering the Ten Ways to Avoid Death by PowerPoint.
(...)


PowerPoint: the promise and the reality
by Clive Shepherd
The promise
PowerPoint was first launched way back in 1987, as a tool to streamline the creation of visual aids for speaker support. It was actually created by a chap called Bob Gaskins and launched with the name Presenter, although it was re-branded by Microsoft who purchased the rights for what, in retrospect, now appears the bargain price of $14m. From its origins as a black-and-white product for the Macintosh, PowerPoint has grown to take at least 95% of the world market for presentation software.
(...)
In 20 years of software development, PowerPoint has been extended to incorporate a powerful array of features and capabilities that allow you to achieve just about any effect you can imagine. And if imagining isn’t your speciality, you can always make use of the glittering libraries of templates and artwork that Microsoft has prepared in advance for your benefit. PowerPoint makes a promise to that vast majority of presenters who have no background in graphic design that they, too, can develop visual aids capable of stunning impact on unsuspecting audiences. Once their presentations were just bad. Now they are professionally bad.
The reality
(...)
But you’re helping no-one by avoiding PowerPoint as a point of principle. Where you can stand out from the crowd is by being the one who uses visual aids appropriately, to add a vital visual dimension to your presentation. According to the research, the most powerful influences on people’s behaviour are strong, simple images. In fact, of the information we receive, only 11% comes from the human voice; the remainder of the brain’s sensory input is from visual sources. The brain has an attentional bias for high contrast and novelty and the attention of your audience is the one thing you simply cannot do without.
What you may find hardest of all is to stop using PowerPoint as a prop, as a presenter’s aid, and to turn the focus on yourself as the principle communicator, ably supported by an excellent software tool. For too many presenters, their PowerPoint slides become the presentation itself, with their role subjugated to that of slide projectionist. We even call PowerPoint files ‘presentations’, when really they are just resources to support real, live presentations given by real, live presenters.


Rethinking e-learning
by Clive Shepherd
In this column, I get the chance to correct what I believe to be the greatest cause of confusion about e-learning. Contrary to what I’ve been told by trainers on countless occasions, e-learning is not just a tool, in fact it isn’t a tool at all (as they say in Ireland). What e-learning is, is a rather inadequate term to describe a channel, a channel of communication through which learning can take place. Like face-to-face communication. Like print. Like the telephone. Like TV and audio systems.
(...)
So, why, at the same time, are we in danger of overstating the significance of e-learning? Well, because it is just a communication channel, a rather sophisticated channel perhaps, but just a channel nonetheless. As a channel, it provides us with three forms of output – a screen, speakers or headphones, and a printer. This is a useful combination, because at its best, it enables a computer to deliver a multimedia experience to match any previous technology. On the other hand it delivers nothing new – sitting in front of the TV while reading a book gives you the same experience. But then because this channel has input devices – keyboards, mice, microphones, webcams, scanners and the rest – it has interactive capabilities; it allows learners to interact with materials, with other learners, with expert sources and facilitators. True, we can do all this already using existing channels, but now we can do it at a distance and at very low cost. Finally, this channel has one other important characteristic and that’s processing power – not as subtle as that of a human being but a whole load faster. This power enables us to create individualised self-study learning experiences, to deliver simulations and games.

Where does that leave us? With a highly versatile new channel that enables us to deliver a wide range of new tools for learning. If we are anxious about this, we shouldn’t be. So far, no new channel has replaced an existing one. Did print see off face-to-face communication? Did the telephone threaten the careers of postmen? Did TV ruin Hollywood? True, in each of these cases some adjustment was necessary, but all those channels seem to be valuable to us; they all add something unique to our lives. E-learning is no different: computers and the networks that connect them constitute another channel for trainers to employ, alongside those we’ve grown to know and love; a channel that we’re only just beginning to understand and exploit; a channel that’s here to stay.


Personal Toolkit: Three thousand communities of practice
By Steve Barth
The most insightful KM comment I ever heard came from a guy in the seat next to me on a flight to Boston about six months ago. After takeoff, he reached into his briefcase and pulled out a stack of PowerPoint printouts for a presentation with knowledge management in the title. It turned out he was chief knowledge officer of an aerospace firm in Los Angeles.
He explained that his company had been pursuing knowledge management for several years. Because they were an organization of engineers, the initial emphasis was on managing documents and content. Lately, however, they had been more interested in establishing communities of practice. “But since we are 3,000 engineers,” he said, “that means that we have 3,000 communities of practice.” (...)


Predictions for 2004: E-learning visionaries look to the future
By Lisa Neal, Editor-In-Chief, eLearn Magazine
What directions will e-learning take in 2004? Will we still call it e-learning? Will there be more or fewer vendors, products, or—most importantly—jobs? Will subject matter experts develop courses instead of instructional designers? Will we all play games and discover along the way that we learned more than ever before—and had fun in the process? Read on for predictions from some of the most thoughtful and opinionated people in e-learning.
“The most central issues to e-Learning over the next year will be context management (context is queen!), learning integration (with systems, but also with work processes and content), and readiness. Increasingly, organizations will use contextual learning—much as the military does today—to ensure that they are ready to hire/deploy, change business models, respond to competitive threats, and enter new markets. By leveraging web services, learners will increasingly be untethered from the classroom and even the desktop, as learning becomes accessible though mobile devices.”—Elliott Masie, President and Founder, The MASIE Center, Saratoga Springs, NY
“In 2004 colleges and universities will finally stop thinking about using information technology (IT) and start thinking seriously about how IT can be used to improve student learning, increase student retention and serve students more cost effectively. IT will be viewed as a vital institutional investment rather than an operating expense.” —Carol A. Twigg, Executive Director, Center for Academic Transformation
“I see things coming together that have been operating separately, for example, knowledge management practices integrated with structured learning events such as courses; Web-based technology used in the classroom; formal and informal learning integrated in the same overall activity or course; and learning objects found or created by the learners themselves as the results of learning activities. Should any of these be called "e-learning" Or all of them? We need a new name for these sorts of synergies.” —Betty Collis, Shell Professor of Networked Learning, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
“2004 will bring a makeover for Training & Development. And, you might not recognize the new look! Three factors will change the face of traditional training and development: increased global competition, outsourcing and smart suites. The most visible of the three, smart suites, will integrate learning at the desktop with an employee’s other tools such as e-mail, calendaring, IM, and document management. In this environment informal learning is pumped-up and the line between learning and doing fades.” —Margaret Driscoll, IBM Global Services
“We will rediscover individual differences, such as visual processing, as an important instructional variable in the design of instruction. This will not be limited to Web-based learning, but learning and teaching in general. I predict that the education and training communities will begin to seriously use games to teach important skills and knowledge.” —Ray Perez, Office of Naval Research
“The looming problems of copyright and patent law will gain widespread attention in 2004. People will come to understand that we are really selling eTeaching and not eLearning (a misunderstanding that contributes greatly to our ongoing problems with ROI). The market may realize that products sold to academia and the corporate world SHOULD be different since they aim at different goals. More people will understand that there is a difference between gaming, game-based learning, and gaming technology. And companies will grow who realize that cultural change MUST accompany an "e" implementation for it to be successful.” —Mark Oehlert, Booz Allen Hamilton
(...)
“The learning industry has been through a period of significant technological innovation and way too much hype. With the recent economic downturn fresh in our minds, in 2004 we'll see learning organizations really searching for, and mastering, the use of proven strategies and technologies for designing, developing, and managing e-learning. The main goal of all this effort being, of course, to improve the quality, usability, and most importantly the effectiveness of the finished product.” —David Holcombe, President & CEO, The eLearning Guild
“Instructional design will become learning design, bringing innovation and creativity to online courses much like the best teachers do in the classroom. Online courses will provide layers of information to encourage exploration, use rewards, surprises, and humor to increase engagement and enjoyment, and support peer learning so that students learn together as well as from each other.” —Lisa Neal, Editor-in-Chief, eLearn Magazine  


Effective—and Ineffective—Instructional Strategies By Jackie Dobrovolny
Here’s a closer look at the features of self-paced, technology-based training that adults say are useful and the relationship between those course features and the learning strategies adults consistently use.
The two previous articles in this series, discuss how adults describe their learning process when taking self-paced, technology-based training. The first article presented a model that indicated adult learning begins with and is sustained by metacognition, which is a learning strategy that consists of self-assessment and self-correction. The model also indicates that reflection, prior experiences, conversations, and authentic experiences are other learning strategies adults frequently use. The second article describes the specific learning strategies adults use when they apply metacognition, reflection, prior experiences, conversations, and authentic experiences. For example, adults use conversations in the following ways to help them learn the content of self-paced, technology-based training:
·         to ask or answer questions about the course content
·         to discuss problems the course content helped them solve
·         to teach a colleague or subordinate something they learned in the course.
Now it’s time to take a look at the relationship between instructional strategies (or course features) that instructional designers use and the five learning strategies that adults use.


giovedì, luglio 03, 2003


Developing a child-centred design process
Children as inspiration for the design of future learning technologies
by Amy Branton
Redefining the 'interactive learning' process
Putting the games and toy industries aside, the main drive behind interactive content development for children is an educational one. In both schools and museums the general opinion is if children have access to computers it should be for specific educational aims derived from the national curriculum and other associated educational bodies. "Edutainment" aims to make learning fun and so far has mainly been developed exactly like the word - a literal splicing of educational content and game-play structure.
This design approach often limits the potential of children's experiences with interactive technologies because it dictates the way they learn by applying existing teaching techniques to content development, rather than acknowledging the great potential interactive technologies have to provide children with new ways of learning. They can be involved in developing for themselves, enabling a redefinition of "interactive learning".
'Interactivity' is not enough
(...)
Academic research vs commercial development
(...)
Four stages of developing a child-centred process
· Designers and developers working in this industry need to stop projecting their own perceptions of technology use on to children and recognise the value of research methods that can be used to involve children in the design process
· they need to be aware of the most appropriate research processes for their target age group. Whilst asking seven-year-olds to design a computer of the future may provide inspiration for some designers, this approach is not suitable for use with four-year-old children
· through these research methods they should aim to develop a fundamental understanding of how their target age group perceive the world around them, how they communicate and connect with it and how they learn through play. Although the difference between adults coming up with a concept based on presumptions about children, designing and developing it and then testing it with them and including children at the start of a project may seem subtle it can make a huge difference to the appropriateness of the final design
· initial concept generation should be derived from the perspective of children as much as possible. Concepts need to be tested with children using an iterative design process, and the results integrated into subsequent design iterations to establish an on-going link with children's needs throughout development and ensure the end product is something children will enjoy and want to interact with on a regular basis.
First hand experience is best
(...)
Future innovation
Real innovation happens when people move beyond existing beliefs and limitations. Designers and developers making products for children need to move away from the limitations of national curriculum guidelines and existing pedagogical methodologies to embrace the exciting new learning opportunities that interactive technologies offer. Future interactive learning products for children need to support their natural desire to explore and discover, make their own connections and find their own "learning" paths, allowing them to be part of developing future ways of learning.


The Threat of Pigeons and Other Fundamentalists
You can train a pigeon to be superstitious by faking a cause-and-effect relationship. But what happens when your boss starts to think like a pigeon?
By: Seth Godin
B.F. Skinner was right: You can make a pigeon superstitious. Just put it in a cage and arrange for food to appear at regular intervals. Whatever the pigeon happens to be doing just as the food arrives -- spinning around, bobbing its head, whatever -- it will keep doing, over and over again, in the hope that the dance caused the food to appear. The pigeon will assume a cause-and-effect relationship that doesn't really exist.
That's what a superstition is: a compulsion to take an action that has no influence on the desired outcome. Pigeons are superstitious, and I'm afraid that most of us are as well. There's plenty we do -- plenty we've always done -- that has nothing to do with what actually works. But once we've made up our minds, we're like pigeons. We don't want to change our behavior, regardless of how much data we see to support a new and better alternative. It's easier to be superstitious, easier to hope that the food will just slide out of the dispenser when we spin around and around.
We don't expect a pigeon to wise up and change its behavior. But what about your boss? Have you ever had a boss who said, "I've looked at all the best thinking on [insert issue here: factory expansion, layoffs, global warming, stem-cell research, foreign trade], and I'm going to change my mind; my old position was wrong, and this is what we should do instead"? Or is your boss, well, more like a pigeon?
I've got nothing against pigeons. The problem comes when superstitions belong to people in power -- when superstitions become the operating system for major companies and other important institutions.
People in power usually want to stay there. And one way they think they can do this is by enforcing rigid adherence to a set of principles that they believe are responsible for their organization's success. By requiring employees to abide by these superstitions -- better known as company policies -- rather than examining the facts, they build organizations that appear streamlined. In fact, they're doomed.
You can think of these managers as examples of the current crop of fundamentalists who are appearing all over the world -- including the world of business. These people are characterized, I believe, by two traits. First, they live according to a large body of superstitions. Second, they believe that they are right and everyone else is wrong. They believe that they have found the one and only truth, and they can't abide changing old rules in light of new data. Fundamentalists decide whether they like a new piece of information based on how it will affect their prior belief system, not based on whether it is actually true.
(...)


Inter-Organizational Communities of Practice
by C. van Winkelen
Communities of Practice are formed by groups of people who come together to learn from one another face-to-face and virtually. This article explores how to design and sustain these communities effectively within organizations.
Community is not a new concept – it is a natural part of human behaviour to socialise and work with others. Yet communities of practice have only gained significant management attention over the past decade, with a flurry of activity as recently as the past three years. Much of this attention has been by large corporations seeking to find new ways to drawn on expertise dispersed across global operations so that they can respond ever more quickly to the demands of customers and the pace of change of technology.
In this report, we briefly look at the key drivers behind these trends and the main learning that has been gained about how to design and sustain these communities effectively within organizations. We will then move on to some of the additional issues that need to be considered when communities reach across external boundaries to support inter-organizational collaboration.
The question at the heart of this report is how to gain satisfactory returns from the investments made in forming and supporting communities of practice. Having looked at the practical activities needed to support effective communities, the report ends with a view of the way in which the value they generate can be measured.
This document has been prepared for the ESEN project. It is intended to stimulate debate around the subject of inter-organization communities of practice, not to provide specific recommendations. It draws on research undertaken by the Henley Management College Knowledge Management Forum, together with published literature.
1. Why form communities of practice?
1.1 Communities of practice within organizations
1.2 Communities of practice as a method of inter-organization collaboration
2. The Knowledge Perspective
3. Enabling communities of practice to be successful
3.1 The experience gained from communities of practice within organizations
3.2 The challenge of inter-organizational communities
4. Measuring the value added by communities
5. Conclusion
6. References
(...)


Six Sigma: Quality Performance by Maryann G. Billington and Peter J. Billington, Ph.D
Chief learning officers in many organizations focus on the cutting edge of business practices to shape the corporate learning agenda. Quality initiatives like Six Sigma have long been a priority on that agenda. Let’s examine three major implications of Six Sigma for the learning organization: learning and training requirements, leadership expectations for the CLO to drive readiness throughout the corporation and application of the principles to the learning organization.
The appearance of “quality” topics originated as early as the 1950s when Deming’s teachings surfaced. In the 1980s, major corporations like Motorola, Digital Equipment, Boeing and Xerox rallied around the quality concept of Six Sigma. In recent years, popularized by General Electric, Allied Signal, Sony, DuPont and others that tell a tale of dramatic quality improvement and change, Six Sigma is at the forefront of quality initiatives commanding CLOs’ attention and learning resources.
Because of the rigorous methodology imposed by Six Sigma, learning and training organizations become heavily involved with preparing employees for Six Sigma. Employees are utilizing Six Sigma skills to drive quality improvement in functions ranging from manufacturing and engineering to purchasing and human resources. What does this enterprise-wide methodology demand from corporate learning organizations?
Six Sigma Defined
Six Sigma is a data-driven, methodical program of continuous and breakthrough improvement focused on customers and their critical requirements. Sigma refers to the Greek symbol (s) that represents the amount of variation in a process. The lower the variation in a process, the fewer defective parts or service transactions are produced, and the higher the Sigma number. The ultimate goal is to eliminate defects and errors and the costs associated with poor quality. After defining which performance measures represent Critical to Customer (CTC) requirements, data are collected on the number of defects and then translated into a sigma number. A sigma of 6 translates to 3.4 defects per million opportunities. (See Table 1.) It is common to find 3 to 4 sigma levels in many manufacturing processes, and 2 or 3 sigma in transactional businesses. Moving from 3 to 4 sigma could be classified as continuous improvement. The breakthroughs occur when a process is improved to the 6 sigma level, almost perfect quality. For example, U.S. daily mail delivery at the 4 sigma level would result in the loss of 20,000 pieces of mail each hour. If mail delivery were at the 6 sigma level, the result would be the loss of seven pieces of mail each hour.
(...)


E-government: se ne discute a Como
02/07/2003 - Villa Erba ospiterà un convegno sull'e-government: soluzioni informatiche al problema della burocrazia europea. E-Tv e altri canali nazionali trasmetteranno l'evento
In principio fu l'e-mail, poi venne l'e-commerce e infine l'e-learning. Oggi si parla di e-government, e la "e" significa sempre electronic. L'informatica sembra destinata a risolvere i grandi problemi di burocrazia e rapporti istituzione-cittadino, moltiplicati da un'Europa che si allarga e che si dota di strumenti di governo sovranazionali. Di questo si discuterà a Villa Erba (Como), i prossimi 7 e 8 luglio, nel corso di una conferenza internazionale, primo importante appuntamento del semestre italiano in Europa. E-TV, il canale satellitare promosso da Epson ad accesso libero che si trova al numero 139 di Telepiù, in collaborazione con Antenna 3 e un circuito di tv locali collegate, trasmetterà l'evento, mettendolo a disposizione del grande pubblico.
Diretta su Antenna 3 – lunedì 7 e martedì 8 luglio, dalle 9.30 alle 17.30.
Ampia sintesi su E-TV – lunedì 7 e martedì 8 luglio, dalle ore 21.00.


Online communities get real
Weblogs, e-mail and instant messaging are enabling people to maintain relationships and pass information in unexpected ways, say researchers.
A study of online communities by UK think-tank The Work Foundation has found that the web is much more localised, more honest and less chaotic than original predictions thought.
So-called social software - e-mail, messaging systems, weblogs and shared online diaries - is allowing people to make the net work for them and bring the virtual world home.
New phenomena such as weblogs have allowed people to share their interest and passions with a wider audience but often provide a quite mundane and honest view of life.
"Increasingly technologies allow people to find out about others in the real world and keep in touch with their day-to-day lives," said the report's author Will Davies.
(...)


25 Trends That Will Change the Way You Do Business
From e-mail to health care, and from artificial intelligence to the end of HR as we know it, here are forecasts of how different the world of workforce management will be 10 years from now.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
orkforce-management decisions aren’t made with crystal balls. What they do demand is a clear sense of the landscape on the far horizon. As a human resources executive, you probably know what health care will cost your company next year.
But you’re far less certain whether or not legions of workers will be full-time telecommuters five years from now, or if defined benefits will even exist in 2013. Fortunately, there are forward-thinkers and trend-spotters out there who make it their business to suss out the future for us.
Our visionaries don’t always agree with each other, as you’ll see. Still, their predictions of what factors will alter the world of workforce management are provocative, and may serve to inform and intrigue all of us who manage people.
E-Mail
Organized Labor
Business Goes to Kindergarten
Going Euro
Companies Won't Sleep
Artificial Intelligence
The Simmering Malaise
Office Design
Defined Benefit Plans
Telework Has a Part-Time Future
Consumer-Driven Health Care Reigns
Child Care
Help Wanted: Ten Million Workers
Outsourcing
Recruiting Older Workers
Mergers
Freelancers and Consultants
Pay for Wellness Performance
Spirituality at Work
Women at Work
Skills Shortage
Security vs Privacy
Accounting for People
Universal Health Care
The End of HR As We Know It
(...)


Top Ten Digital Photography Tips
by Derrick Story
You've heard this before: Digital cameras do all the work. You just push the button and great pictures magically appear. The better the camera, the better the photos. Isn't that right? Heck no!
The truth is that you can make great photos with a simple consumer point-and-shoot camera, or take lousy shots with the most expensive Nikon. It's not the camera that makes beautiful images; it's the photographer. With a little knowledge and a willingness to make an adjustment here and there, you can squeeze big time photos out of the smallest digicam.
To help you down the road to great image making, here are ten tips that will enable you shoot like a pro (without maxing out your credit card on all that expensive equipment).
(...)


Content management: critical skill of modern manager
By Gerry McGovern
The Internet has changed how organizations manage. Historically, management was focused on 'walking and talking.' Today, 'reading and writing' are becoming more and more central. This trend is reinforced by a recent META Group study, which found that 80 percent of business people choose email as their primary communication tool.
(...)


Companies get into weblog act
By Hiawatha Bray
It was bound to happen: Corporate America has discovered the blog. The proof was at hand during last week's ClickZ Weblog Business Strategies 2003 Conference & Expo. The sponsors had set aside a smallish conference room at the Sheraton Boston, and ended up having to knock out the collapsible rear wall and lug in more tables and chairs.
Too bad they couldn't also have called in an electrician to install more power outlets. A goodly percentage of the guests were toting laptops equipped with WiFi ethernet cards. The organizers had the good judgment to set up a wireless broadband router, so these well-equipped guests spent pretty much the entire conference updating their own blogs. At least until the batteries ran out.
In any case, there's plenty of juice left in the blogging boom. That's the practice of using simple software that allows you to easily create a running commentary on your life or anybody else's, published instantly to the Internet. Blogs are an elaboration of the old personal Web page concept. But the blog, thank heaven, quickly transcended the original paradigm, with its photos of the family dog and discussions of Junior's potty training accident. Come to think of it, though, most blogs still aren't much better.
(...)


Verso una Strategia Intranet
di Mariano Corso e Andrea Rangone e Stefano Mainetti, Mip - Politecnico di Milano
Lo sviluppo di una strategia Intranet può essere letto come un ciclo che prevede sei passi fondamentali. Si tratta di una sequenza che va intesa dal punto di vista logico piuttosto che temporale: ciascuna fase rappresenta in realtà un processo che, pur potendo trovare dei momenti di esplicitazione, deve essere continuamente portato avanti e messo in discussione.


Figura 1 - La definizione degli obiettivi e la giustificazione degli investimenti


(...)


La persona alla base dell'Intranet
di Roberto Cobianchi, Webegg
Da "nice to have" a "must have", questa l'evoluzione dell'Intranet nell'ultimo anno. Nonostante ciò questo non sembra che si stiano affermando modelli di riferimento, esempi best in class verso i quali confrontare scelte.
Troviamo Intranet che hanno l'obiettivo di rivolgersi a tutta l'organizzazione a fianco di altre con l'orizzonte più ristretto della singola business unit; troviamo modelli di governo molto centralizzati accanto a modelli talmente decentralizzati da scivolare nella anarchia gestionale e tecnologica. Quasi sempre troviamo stili di comunicazione talmente scarni ("perché l'importante è il contenuto e non la grafica") da risultare assolutamente sgradevoli.
Il nocciolo della questione è che nessuno, oggi, ha ancora "codificato" come sia fatta un'Intranet, "dimostrato" un legame diretto tra l'investimento ed il beneficio, "descritto" il cambiamento organizzativo generato attraversi l''Intranet.
Questo è uno dei motivi per cui è ancora molto alto il livello di scetticismo di gran parte dei manager, i quali nel migliore dei casi investono poco e il più delle volte cedendo alle pressioni dell'IT Manager. Eppure, le ricerche indicano che le Intranet hanno un impatto diretto sul risultato aziendale ed un effetto significativo sull'efficienza e produttività delle persone (per esempio molte Fortune 500 rendicontano ROI fino a 20 milioni di dollari nel giro di pochi anni).
Descriverne gli impatti organizzativi e giustificarne gli investimenti in maniera rigorosa, tanto più se questo riguarda l'Intranet, un fatto in piena evoluzione. Quello che però si può fare è qualche esemplificazione sullo svolgimento operativo dell'approccio strategico che pone la persona al centro dell'Intranet. Infatti da molto tempo oramai affermiamo che la persona è al centro dell'intranet, e non ci stancheremo mai di ripeterlo: qualunque sia il modello d'intranet adottato (istituzionale, di knowledge, operativa) sarà sempre la persona il destinatario dei contenuti e dei servizi, quindi se l'intranet coglie le esigenze operative e informative delle persone, là dove e nel momento in cui esse si manifestano, potrà avere successo.
L'Intranet non può essere un ambiente parallelo a quello dove si svolge l'attività della persona, un'altra icona sul desktop. Il più delle volte è così: vediamo le persone che utilizzano le business application specifiche del mestiere, poi ogni tanto accedono all'Intranet per cercare un interno telefonico, vedere le ultime discussioni sul newsgroup, leggere l'ultima comunicazione organizzativa.
(...)


I differenti livelli di integrazione di una Intranet
di Stefano Mainetti, MIP - Politecnico di Milano
I progetti Intranet permettono la realizzazione di un unico punto d'accesso alle applicazioni informatiche presenti in azienda. Per cogliere questo risultato risulta fondamentale integrare le applicazioni dell'Intranet con i vari sistemi applicativi componenti il Sistema Informativo aziendale.
Per analizzare più nel dettaglio quest'aspetto abbiamo considerato due livelli fondamentali cui pu? avvenire l'integrazione fra le varie applicazioni:
> Front-end, comprendente l'interfaccia utilizzata dall'utente per accedere alle funzionalità delle applicazioni;
> Back-end, comprendente il sistema di comunicazione, a livello dati o a livello applicativo, delle applicazioni.
Per quanto riguarda il front-end sono stati individuati quattro differenti gradi di integrazione:
> Interfacce differenti e separate (nessuna integrazione);
> Collegamento mediante link;
> Interfacce incapsulate (rimangono le interfacce native delle applicazioni, incapsulate in un contenitore comune);
> Unico ambiente di navigazione (user experience omogenea).
Per quanto riguarda il back-end sono stati individuati tre differenti gradi di integrazione:
>nessuna integrazione;
>integrazione "punto a punto" (ogni applicativo dispone di collegamenti ad hoc con le altre applicazioni o con le basi di dati);
> unico ambiente di integrazione (è presente uno strato di middleware).


Figura 2 - Integrazioni dell'intranet
Analizzando il posizionamento dei casi appare evidente come siano ben poche le Intranet in cui è prevista un'elevata integrazione sia a livello di front-end sia a livello di back-end. Il motivo di questo ritardo pu? essere ricondotto all'approccio generalmente seguito nello sviluppo di questa tipologia di progetti, che spesso nascono spinti da motivazioni contingenti e senza una pianificazione strategica adeguata.
Dall'analisi del posizionamento dei singoli casi emerge inoltre un raggruppamento in base al modello di Intranet analizzata:
> Le Intranet Istituzionali, sviluppate prevalentemente come portali aggregatori di contenuti, presentano una scarsa integrazione di back-end con gli altri sistemi informativi aziendali e di conseguenza hanno difficoltà nel supportare l'operatività aziendale;
> Le Intranet di Knowledge Management hanno una limitata integrazione in entrambi i sensi, costituendo delle applicazioni solitamente isolate che hanno difficoltà ad uniformarsi con le altre applicazioni a livello di interfaccia e di modello dati di riferimento;
> Le Intranet Operative, proprio per la loro finalità di supporto ai processi operativi, presentano una buona integrazione a livello di back-end ma presentano problematiche riguardanti la scarsa coerenza delle interfacce utente, con ovvie ricadute sull'usabilità.


Report Intranet Files:
"Creare valore attraverso le intranet: strategia o casualità?"
I contenuti del Report
1. I MODELLI DI INTRANET
> Le funzionalità
> Le Intranet Istituzionali
> Le Intranet di Knowledge Management
> Le Intranet Operative
> La rilevanza strategica
2. LE SCELTE TECNOLOGICHE
> Le piattaforme tecnologiche
> Le modalità di sviluppo
> L’integrazione
> Uno schema di riferimento
> Il modello ad isole applicative
> Il C-model
3. LA GESTIONE DEL CAMBIAMENTO E LE SOLUZIONI DI GOVERNANCE
> La governance nella fase di sviluppo delle Intranet
> La governance nella fase di gestione delle Intranet
> Gli stili di leadership
> Le logiche di coinvolgimento e di incentivazione degli utenti
4. I RISULTATI DELLE INTRANET E GLI IMPATTI ORGANIZZATIVI
> La definizione degli obiettivi e la giustificazione degli investimenti
> La misura delle performance ex-post
> Gli impatti organizzativi
5. VERSO UNA STRATEGIA INTRANET
> L’identificazione dell’ambito dell’azione
> La definizione delle funzionalità
> L’impostazione della strategia tecnologica e la progettazione dell’architettura
> La giustificazione dell’investimento
> La gestione del cambiamento e la definizione della governance
> L’analisi dei risultati e l’avvio di un nuovo ciclo


A Parma il debito formativo si recupera online
Recuperare il debito formativo dove, quando e come si vuole, seguiti da un tutor e incontrando gli altri studenti in aule virtuali. E' l'occasione offerta dal progetto "E-learning per il recupero del debito formativo", promosso per la prima volta dalla Provincia di Parma. Quest'estate quattro scuole superiori parteciperanno alla sperimentazione: ITSOS di Langhirano, ITG Rondani, ITC Melloni e IPS Giordani. Gli studenti seguiranno percorsi di recupero online e potranno scegliere tempi, luoghi e strategie di studio. Gli insegnanti che li assisteranno ne valuteranno l'apprendimento in modo continuo e potranno rimodellare gli interventi formativi durante il corso. La piattaforma e-learning utilizzata sarà SOL-Studio Online, sviluppata dal laboratorio di telematica per il territorio e già utilizzata in altre sperimentazioni locali di didattica online. Le aule virtuali di Studio Online faranno incontrare i ragazzi e metteranno a disposizione materiali per approfondire specifici argomenti.
(...)


Sì all'open source nell'istruzione. Ma servono professionisti adeguati
Largo al software libero nella scuola. L'importante è che sia una scelta compiuta in base alla valutazione del rapporto fra costi e benefici. E' la conclusione a cui è giunta dopo cinque mesi di lavoro la commissione sull'open source creata in gennaio dal ministro per l'Innovazione e tecnologie Lucio Stanca e presieduta da Angelo Raffaele Meo del Politecnico di Torino. Del gruppo di esperti ha fatto parte anche Alessandro Musumeci, direttore generale del servizio per l'automazione informatica e l'innovazione tecnologica del MIUR.
L'Indagine conoscitiva sul software a codice sorgente aperto nella Pubblica Amministrazione ha radiografato utilizzo e costi del software negli uffici pubblici italiani. Il rapporto stilato dalla commissione (disponibile in formato Pdf sul sito del Mit) esamina tre aree di interesse nazionale: l’istruzione, l’industria, la ricerca. Il paradigma del software OS, viene sottolineato, comporta implicazioni culturali e sociali come la circolazione del sapere, la libertà di divulgazione scientifica dei risultati della ricerca ed il dibattito sulle questioni connesse con la tutela del diritto d’autore. Il rapporto fra software OS ed istruzione, sia scolastica che universitaria, non è perci? riducibile a un fatto meramente tecnologico.
Sul piano didattico il software OS è importante non solo nell’insegnamento dell’informatica e nella didattica specialistica per gli studenti delle scuole tecniche, ma anche per l'insegnamento delle varie discipline. Nel funzionamento delle infrastrutture informatiche il software OS entra invece in gioco con l’adozione del sistema operativo Linux sui server, nella gestione di reti e servizi in rete, nell’uso di suite di office automation OS su client.
Il software OS pu? avere un ruolo significativo, osserva il rapporto, a patto di identificarne con precisione l’ambito ed il ruolo e di creare professionisti adeguati. In particolare, vi sono quattro aree in cui si ritiene di poter intervenire: utilizzo diretto di prodotti open source, analisi e studio di codici, sviluppo e integrazione di e con codice OS, modifica e riuso di risorse OS per la didattica ed i servizi di rete.
(...)


More Companies Pay Heed to Their 'Word of Mouse' Reputation
By NICHOLAS THOMPSON
(...)
In late April, the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was host to a conference, financed by the National Science Foundation, on "reputation mechanisms in online communities." At the conference, academic experts in game theory, sociology and marketing discussed how "word of mouse" influences businesses as well as how eBay and other e-commerce companies can better manage the quality of the information the public posts on Web sites and reduce the risk of fraud online.
"The data are a researcher's playground," said Paul Resnick, an associate professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information and one of the organizers of the M.I.T. conference.
(...)


The Most Important User Experience Method
by Mark Hurst
Get Good Experience by e-mail: e-mail update@goodexperience.com
One of my favorite stories about user experience consulting came from a project Creative Good conducted a couple of years back for a large organization. The project team went through the usual steps - creating a business-focused context, conducting user tests (what we call "listening labs"), and making recommendations for improvement with wireframe diagrams(...)


Overcoming Obstacles to E-Learning: A Supplier's Perspective
By Jack Pierce
Here’s an update from the front lines of the battle to engage learners and satisfy customers.
Success is all about getting results, so as suppliers we have to keep asking ourselves if we’re really making a difference. Sometimes, you just don’t know. To find out what customers were really think, Learn. Perform. Succeed! sent out a survey to find out it was doing right—and wrong.
The good news: nearly half of the respondents said that they wouldn’t change a thing about the program, and we received such comments as, “It’s more like playing a game than going to school.”
Reviews like that make a great story, right? But the real story is in the problems Learn. Perform. Succeed! overcame to get to that point, and the lessons we learned along the way.
(...)
End result
At Learn. Perform. Succeed!, we avoid herd thinking and are committed to staying out of the stampede to trendy solutions. Indeed, we strive for innovation and creativity, and we try to build strong relationships. Perhaps the biggest lesson we've learned working with clients, is that there’s no one right way to approach e-learning.


Using Multiple Intelligence Theory in the Virtual Classroom
By Margie Meacham
Combining what we know about multiple intelligences with virtual classroom features can help us enrich e-learners’ experiences.
Howard Gardner, creator of the theory of multiple intelligences (MI), alerted us to the different ways people process information and to the importance of taking that into account when designing learning events. You may have modified the activities in your traditional classroom based on multiple intelligences theory, but what about your virtual classroom? In many companies, 50 percent or more of the curriculum is now offered in some form of collaborative virtual classroom. And yet, much of that material appears to be little more than PowerPoint slides with audio of the instructor’s voice. Often, companies assume that this limited approach is all that’s possible with existing technology. But many more features exist in a virtual classroom, and combining these with what we know about MI can help us enrich e-learners’ experiences. Here’s how.
Use all of the available features
There are dozens of major virtual classroom providers and hundreds of companies that resell the classrooms under a private label arrangement. Once you select the right virtual classroom for your needs and budget, you can begin to design learning events and programs that take advantage of the available features. Available features vary a bit from provider to provider, but most providers offer the ability to
* display presentations, such as PowerPoint slide shows
* share the facilitator’s desktop or an application
* use a whiteboard for drawing and charting
* hold conversations in a chat room or sub-chat rooms
* create voice sub-conferences, often called breakout rooms
* document and slide markup tools such as highlighters and text and drawing tools
* administer surveys and quizzes
* download documents and reference materials
* connect to URLs on the Internet or an intranet
* use symbols, sometimes called emoticons, to show emotions and raise questions.
Plan to engage as many different intelligences as possible
(...)
Put it all together
(...)


Da Arezzo un esempio di ProgettAzione di una comunità di apprendimento
Il CSA di Arezzo raccoglie la sfida dell'e-learning mettendo a disposizione delle scuole della provincia uno strumento on-line di comunicazione avanzata. Il progetto è stato presentato l'11 giugno nel corso della conferenza "Iniziative per la formazione integrata, in presenza e a distanza". Si tratta di "Progett/Azione", un ambiente di collaborazione in rete ad accesso riservato realizzato in collaborazione con European Schoolnet con lo scopo di offrire supporto e coordinamento delle iniziative a livello provinciale attraverso una serie di servizi: forum, messaggi istantanei, segnalazione di siti web, pubblicazione di pagine web, condivisione di file, posta, calendario di tutte le iniziative delle scuole della provincia, chat. Questa utilità, che è dedicata esclusivamente all'uso scolastico, vuole contribuire a creare un ambiente collaborativo di formazione che stimoli l'approccio alle nuove tecnologie e iscriva le iniziative scolastiche in un orizzonte di partecipazione e di autonomia.


SmartCanal, Une communication innovante sur le marché de la formation en ligne
SmartCanal, spécialiste des solutions e-learning hébergées, communique auprès des enseignes grande distribution. CARREFOUR Autoroutes, GO SPORT, Centre commercial Atlantis Nantes (LECLERC)
Du 29 Mai au 22 Juin, les enseignes CARREFOUR Autoroutes, GO SPORT et le centre commercial Atlantis Nantes (LECLERC) diffuseront par le biais d'écrans plasma un spot publicitaire de 20 secondes présentant les activités de SmartCanal.


Comment intégrer le e-learning à un dispositif de formation professionnelle continue?
par Muriel Janoir Bessioud
L’étude de terrain s’appuie sur une expérience menée au sein du service formation d’une importante société éditrice de logiciels d’entreprise.
Table des matières :
1. Avant propos
2. Introduction au mémoire
3. Introduction à l'analyse bibliographique
4. Guide d'utilisation de l'analyse bibliographique
5. L'analyse bibliographique
e-formation : effet de mode ou changement majeur ?
Quels sont les changements induits par la formation en ligne ?
Doit-on recourir au e-learning ? : le pour et le contre
6. Introduction à l'étude de terrain
7. La validation terrain
8. Synthèse de la validation terrain
9. L'intégration du e-learning à une offre de formation traditionnelle : facteurs clés de succès et recommandations
10. Conclusion : le e-learning : une aventure humaine
11. Glossaire
Télécharger le document complet (format PDF - 164 pages, 5 Mo) :TELECHARGER LE DOCUMENT


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